Tuesday, 1 March 2016

Sitka, Alaska

Travel Photo Tuesday


Russian Orthodox Church, Sitka Alaska

Sitka was once the capital of the Imperial Russian Empire in Alaska. Now it is a sleepy little town with a population of less than 9,000 inhabitants. When Russia sold Alaska to the U.S in what turned out to be one of the best real estate deals in history the Russian population left, but enough of their history lives on to make this a fascinating place to visit. Yet another town which is unconnected by road to the mainland of Alaska, Sitka suffers less from cruise ship overload with the ships calling in less frequently than other south-eastern Alaskan ports.



 Click here to read more about our visit to Sitka.





Sitka Harbor
Sitka Harbor

Sitka Harbor
Sitka Harbor
Salmon Berry. Sitka Alaska
Salmon Berries grew wild outside our accommodation. They were sweet and delicious.


Bald Eagles, Sitka Alaska
Sitka is fantastic for seeing Bald Eagles.

Bald Eagle, Sitka Alaska
This eagle sat in a tree outside our B&B every morning.

Sitka National Historical Park
If you visit Sitka, don't miss the totem poles in the National Historical Park.




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The Russian Bishop's House
The Russian Bishop's House

Inside the Russian Bishop's House
Inside the Russian Bishop's House



Brown bear at The Fortress of the Bear
Brown bear at The Fortress of the Bear - The Brown Bears around Sitka are larger than both Black Bears and Grizzlies, although Grizzlies are a type of Brown Bear. 

Brown bear at The Fortress of the Bear

For all my posts on our Alaska and Canada road and car ferry trip click - here.

40 comments:

  1. You learn something new every day! I never realised that parts of Alaska were once Russian territory ... I mean it makes sense ... but I just never knew! Would love to do a cruise of Alaska/Canada one day :-)

    Visiting from #teamIBOT x

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    1. I learn so many interesting things when we travel. D has a degree in history so we tend to seek out a bit of history when we go places.

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  2. I've never heard of salmon berries. I'd like to try them - it looks luscious.
    Thanks for sharing at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2016/02/the-walls-of-san-juan.html

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    1. I hadn't heard of them either but they were delicious.

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  3. Lyn the photos are all gorgeous but the bearings are especially superb. Lucky you to see one so closely and in a safe place to photograph it!

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    1. Haha - being downunder is affecting your spelling. It took me a minute to work out you meant bears. Yes, they were magnificent. David, especially loved them which is unusual for him. He isn't usually an animal person.

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  4. We only spent a couple of hours in Sitka while on our cruise, but I could have stayed there for a week. In fact I could have spent a week in each of our ports photographing the incredible landscape. Very nice set of images.

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    1. We were there for four nights and it was just about perfect. A day would be good to get a taste of the place but not enough to see everything at a calm pace.

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  5. A wonderful series of photos!
    Lea

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  6. What a beautiful place and gorgeous photography ~ thanks!

    Happy Week to you ~ ^_^

    ps. Hollywood made a movie on Cape Ann MA and Sitka was the name they gave to the town for the movie ~ interesting to see it again ~ it resembles Cape Ann MA somewhat ~

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    1. Pity it wasn't actually made in Sitka - what a shame! Interesting to know though.

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  7. Hi Y'all!

    Love the bears. Beautiful photos of Sitka.

    Y'all come on by,
    Hawk aka BrownDog

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  8. I had no idea Alaska was once Russian! Why did they sell it?
    Beautiful pictures but it looks cold. Isn't it weird how a picture can look hot or cold?

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    1. They sold it for the same reason that so many things get sold - they needed the money. They had wasted too much on wars and they thought it was worthless. They saw Alaska only in terms of the fur trade - otter and other small animal pelts - mostly sold to China. When the pelt industry dried up (I think they over harvested) they just couldn't see the value in keeping it. One of the worst real estate moves in history I imagine.

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  9. When I saw your harbor photo, I wondered if Sandra Bullock's movie, "The Proposal", was made there. So, I checked, and yes, it was. Your photos just has me wanting to see Sitka even more. Thanks for sharing.
    The View from the Top of the Ladder

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    1. I hate to disappoint you but quite a few people have told me that while the movie was set in Sitka it was actually filmed in Massachusetts. I'm still going to watch it again though!

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  10. That is absolutely beautiful! I love sleepy towns by the water. :) I didn't know Alaska used to be a Russian Empire (thanks for the history lesson). :)

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    1. My pleasure. Thank you for the kind comments.

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  11. Salmon berries. Do they taste like the local catch?

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  12. What an interesting town. Really need to get to Alaska!

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    1. Sitka was one of the most interesting places we saw.

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  13. I had always associated Sitka with Alaskan cruises. Love how you got a close up of the salmon berries....but not too close to the bears!

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    1. Not many cruise ships call there which makes it a lot less crowded than some of the other towns.

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  14. What a fabulous place! I checked out some of your other shot of this lace and the Russian history is so fantastic!

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    1. The Russian connection is one of the most interesting things about Sitka. The other really fascinating bit was the Totem Pole park.

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  15. Spotting wildlife is one of my favorite things to do. Sitka seems like an ideal place to do that.

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    1. It is the perfect place to see bald eagles.

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  16. I love this post! I knew that the USA had purchased Alaska from Russia, but for some reason, it never dawned on me that you could see bits of Russian history in Alaska as a result. This post reminds me of the Russian Quarter in Dalian, China, and I did a Photo Friday post about it about a month ago. I think you'll find it interesting - http://www.trekkingwithbecky.com/russia-in-dalian-china/

    Thanks again for such an interesting post! :D

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    1. I have had a look at your post. Wow - who would ever imagine that was China. I find it really interesting when you come across evidence of other histories and cultures in countries where you would least expect them.

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  17. Beautiful photos. I've never been to Alaska, but one of these days. I also knew about the purchase, but never thought of the Russian influence lingering on. Very interesting! Thanks for linking up this week. #TPThursday

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    1. I think the lingering Russian influence just shows how traditions can be handed down even when the people who began them are long gone.

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  18. I'll be back in AK around summer time! It's such a beautiful state!!!

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  19. Sitka is high on my Alaska list.... I have wanted to visit it for a long time now.Those totem poles are stunning.

    Lisa @ Life Thru the Lens

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    1. The totem poles were my favourite part. They are in a natural setting which is just lovely to wander through.

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